China fine tuning its cooperation machine

Authorities of the world’s second largest economic power confirmed that in addition to the issues addressed in the Forum, China will also work to respond to the growing need to create cooperation platforms between nations, in response to the global financial crisis and increasing protectionism.

Looking to consolidate this economic route, which should account for over 60% of the world’s population and a third of global production, participants in the Forum discussed ways to optimize complementarity between the development strategies of each nation, and promote cooperation initiatives benefitting communities living along the trade route.

A note on Belt and Road

According to an article posted on Qiushi (bit.do/beltandroad), the Organ of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, “China’s new commercial strategy will allow Latin America and the Caribbean to join this drive of ‘opening up, inclusiveness and mutual benefits.’ ”

“Africa is also expected to benefit considerably from China’s pledged resources in the coming years,” the article stated and “other benefits are China’s supported financing of anti-poverty and improved health care projects.”

China, Vietnam pledge to boost ‘comradely, brotherly’ ties

Yu said in his meeting with Quang that China and Vietnam are good neighbors, have the same political system, face common development challenges and have positive cooperation prospects. He said the two countries should seize the opportunity of building the Belt and Road Initiative to expand bilateral cooperation. He said the CPPCC will continue to work closely with the Vietnam Fatherland Front to share ideas on political consultation and promote people-to-people exchanges.

Liu said in his meeting with Quang that China and Vietnam have a shared future and the two countries should help each other through good and bad times.

Only two options in Korea: war or peace

[D]uring the Korean War, the United States firebombed all of North Korea’s cities, razing them to the ground, and covered the entire country in Napalm, a chemical weapon. 3-4 million Koreans died, including 20% of North Korea’s entire population. One million Chinese died, and about 37,000 U.S. soldiers were also killed.

The DPRK has sought a peace treaty with the United States many times, but none was ever signed. The Korean War was only stalled by an Armistice Agreement. The line separating the South from the North remains the most militarized border in the world and the U.S. maintains over a hundred military bases in the ROK and nearby Japan. […]

[Chung] Kiyul[, visiting professor from Tsinghua University,] noted that “even the U.S. government, including the Trump administration, acknowledge no matter what the U.S. has done so far, the last 20-30 years has failed” in bringing about the U.S. goal of regime change in the DPRK.

“The message the DPRK leadership sent to Washington was, ‘Let’s sit and find the way to bring about the peace regime,” said Kiyul “meaning concluding the peace treaty by replacing armistice agreement.” Kiyul believes the time is coming when “northeast Asia and the Korean peninsula may face a new wave of dialogue and engagement.”